personal, recovery

day 400 – observing world mental health day

healing

“And this time, I can feel my hand. I can feel everything. And I want to keep feeling everything. Even the painful, awful, terrible things. Because feeling things is what lets us know that we’re alive. And I want to be alive.”

“For too long, I’ve made my past my future, afraid to imagine anything else. And I acted like that—static—afraid of my own kinetic energy. Maybe it’s time to start imagining, maybe it’s time to be in motion. Maybe it’s time for me to fight back against the sadness inside of me.” — Jasmine Warga

*~*~*~*~*~*~*

Yesterday was World Mental Health Day, for those of you who didn’t already know.

As a depressed (and sometimes anxious) alcoholic in recovery, I know the depths and the shallows… the darkness and the blinding mania… the wantingness to either sleep forever or never sleep again… and everything outside and in between these psychological barriers… I know *all these things* all too well.

HOWEVER, I also know that pain is temporary… I know the sun is always hiding behind the clouds… I know there is hope… I know how to remind myself things will always get better.

Things get better with (but not limited to): Patience. Time. Work. Kindness. Honesty. Forgiveness. Recovery. Repeat.

I cannot advocate enough about the importance of coping + communicating as opposed to suffering in silence. Even if it hurts too much, or feels like an overbearing indifference. Even if you want time to reverse, stop, or speed up…

You are not alone. Your feelings are valid. You matter. You are perfectly imperfect. You are an exceptional, one-of-a-kind human being, and deserving of love. You are enough. You are SO enough. 🌹

(art is: The Frizz Kid who also had this to say about World Mental Health Day…

“Remember to be there for you neurodivergent/mad-identified/mentally ill friends in more ways than just a supportive status once a year. Remember that mental illness shows itself in different ways, in different people. Remember that being “high-functioning” or laughing and going out doesn’t mean a person’s mental illness has disappeared.

Remember that you are not owed an explanation as to why your friend may be feeling anxious, depressed, etc. because sometimes explaining why is a challenge, we often aren’t sure why. Remember that one person’s way of coping is not going to be the same as another. Remember that recovery narratives can often be toxic because for most people, mental illness is for life and it’s the ways we cope with them that change. Remember that your self-care, self-love, healing, and resiliency are defined by you for yourself.

Remember to not scoff at self-diagnosis, because psychiatric assessments with doctors to diagnose a mental illness can be extremely traumatizing, inaccessible, and that diagnoses can change over the years. Remember to be kind, to hold yourself and others accountable, to exercise basic empathy, and to keep these reminders in your heart everyday.” )

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